Let’s Talk Teen Mental Health

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) states that one in five teenagers has a mental health condition.

World Teen Mental Wellness Day

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that half of all mental health issues start before a child reaches the age of 14. Unfortunately, most cases are not diagnosed or treated by this time.

What is World Teen Mental Wellness Day?

World Teen Mental Wellness Awareness Day,

a day of awareness created by the clothing company Hollister, was the first of its kind focused on mental illness among teenagers. It is celebrated annually on March 2nd.

According to Banyan Treatment Centers, mental health refers to “the state of well-being in which one realizes their abilities, can cope with normal stressors in life, can work productively and fruitfully, can contribute to their community. 

While the study of mental health has become more prevalent over the years, the stigma and prejudice that often follow mental illness diagnoses are far too common in today’s society.

One common misconception is the idea of mental illness and mental health being interchangeable terms. Mental health is crucial to all individuals with or without a mental illness.

“Many are unaware of the prevalence of mental health disorders among teens and adolescents, and the stigma associated with disorders like depression and anxiety can discourage them from asking for help. “ –

Banyan Treatment Centers

World Teen Mental Wellness Day encourages participation in important conversations about mental illness.

On March 2nd, we encourage you to start an open dialogue and spread awareness concerning the mental health of teens. Remember that mental illness is more common than you know.

Ways to Participate in World Teen Mental Wellness Day

Show yourself love

Being a teenager is difficult enough. Add a worldwide pandemic to the mix, and it’s understandable for anyone to get emotionally overwhelmed. Take time out of your day to show yourself kindness and engage in activities like meditation, yoga, reading, and journaling to get to know your mind and decompress on stressful days.

Reach out to teens.

If you know any teens, check in on them frequently. Sometimes, people just need someone to talk to and confide in, and simply asking how someone’s day is going or reminding them that you’re around can make a huge difference. If their situation seems concerning, maybe let a family member know. In any case of emergency or immediate threat, call 911.

Get help for yourself.

If you’re a teen struggling with their mental health, don’t hesitate to reach out for help. There is no shame in getting therapy or seeking professional guidance. Go to your doctor and talk to them about your symptoms so they can diagnose you properly and create a treatment plan that meets your needs.

Use your library as a resource.

We know mental health can be a difficult topic to talk about. As library staff, we are here to help. Please don’t hesitate to ask. You are not alone!

If you would prefer to browse on your own, the call numbers below will help you get started.

  • Alcoholism 362.292
  • Anxiety 616.8522
  • Bipolar Disorder 616.895
  • Depression 616.8527
  • Drug Addiction 362.29
  • Eating Disorders 616.85
  • Suicide 362.2

Are you in emotional distress or a suicidal crisis?

When people call, text, or chat 988, they will be connected to trained counselors that are part of the existing Lifeline network. These trained counselors will listen, understand how their problems affect them, provide support, and connect them to necessary resources.

Call or Text 9-8-8

Local Resources

Mental health resources are available in Lehigh County.

Lehigh County Warmline

Phone: 610-820-8451

Warmline is a confidential 7 days/week telephone support service manned by trained mental health consumers.  Warmline operates daily but is not able to accept calls between 2-6am.

National Alliance on Mental Health – Lehigh Valley

Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255

Information: 1-800-273-8255

The families and members of NAMI Lehigh Valley are here to help! We offer understanding to anyone concerned about mental illnesses and the treatment of mental illness. We are dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with mental illness and their families through support, education, and advocacy.

Parkland Community Library

We know mental health can be a difficult topic to talk about. As library staff, we are here to help. Please don’t hesitate to ask. You are not alone!

If you would prefer to browse on your own, the call numbers below will help you get started.

  • Alcoholism 362.292
  • Anxiety 616.8522
  • Bipolar Disorder 616.895
  • Depression 616.8527
  • Drug Addiction 362.29
  • Eating Disorders 616.85
  • Suicide 362.2

State Resources

Mental health resources are available in the state of Pennsylvania.

Resources from the State of Pennsylvania

Find help and treatment options, complete a mental health screening, and more.

National Resources

Mental health resources are available to anyone in the United States.

988 Suicide and Crisis LifeLine

Phone or Text: 9-8-8

9-8-8 has been designated as the new three-digit dialing code to route callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (now known as the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline) and is active across the United States.

When people call, text, or chat 9-8-8, they will be connected to trained counselors in the existing Lifeline network. These trained counselors will listen, understand how their problems affect them, provide support, and connect them to necessary resources.

The previous Lifeline phone number (1-800-273-8255) will remain available to people in emotional distress or suicidal crisis.

imi

Text the word “imi” to 70764 or download the messaging app.

Guides built for and with LGBTQ+ teens to help you explore your identity and support your mental health.

imi can play an essential role in helping LGBTQ+ teens cope with sexual and gender minority stress. This app is designed with ample resources to get teens support and answers. Join a peer support chat group by age, call the talk line, link to helpful organizations, and access online resources.

National Alliance on Mental Illness

Phone: 800-950-6264

Text: “HelpLine” to 62640

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness.

NAMI envisions a world where all people affected by mental illness live healthy, fulfilling lives supported by a community that cares. The organization provides advocacy, education, support, and public awareness so that all individuals and families affected by mental illness can build better lives.

The Trevor Project

Phone: 866-488-7386

Text: 678-678

Two decades ago, The Trevor Project responded to a health crisis. They aim to end suicide among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning young adults. The organization envisions a world where all LGBTQ+ young people see a brighter future for themselves.

Our Book Suggestions

PCL’s Teen Librarian Assistant curated a list of books featuring characters with a mental illness

(Don’t) Call Me Crazy, edited by Kelly Jensen

What does it mean to be crazy? Is using the word crazy offensive? What happens when such a label gets attached to your everyday experiences? In order to understand mental health, we need to talk openly about it. Because there’s no single definition of crazy, no single experience embodies it, and the word itself means different things — wild? Extreme? Disturbed? Passionate? — to different people. 

(Don’t) Call Me Crazy is a conversation starter and guide to better understanding how mental health affects us daily. Thirty-three writers, athletes, and artists offer essays, lists, comics, and illustrations that explore their personal experiences with mental illness, how we do and do not talk about mental health, help for a better understanding of how every person’s brain is wired differently, and what, exactly, might make someone crazy. If you’ve ever struggled with your mental health or know someone who has, come on in, turn the pages, and let’s get talking.

Verona Comics by Jennifer Dugan

Jubilee has it all together. She’s an elite cellist, and when she’s not working in her stepmom’s indie comic shop, she’s prepping for the biggest audition of her life.

Ridley is barely holding it together. His parents own the biggest comic store chain in the country, and Ridley can’t stop disappointing them–that is when they’re even paying attention.

They meet one fateful night at a comic convention prom, and the two can’t help falling for each other. Too bad their parents are at each other’s throats every chance they get, making a relationship between them nearly impossible . . . unless they manage to keep it a secret.

Then again, the feud between their families may be the least of their problems. As Ridley’s anxiety spirals, Jubilee tries to help but finds her focus torn between her fast-approaching audition and their intensifying relationship. What if love can’t conquer all? What if each of them needs more than the other can give?

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

In the real world, Eliza Mirk is shy, weird, and friendless. Online, she’s LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of the wildly popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. Eliza can’t imagine enjoying the real world as much as she loves the online one, and she has no desire to try. Then Wallace Warland, Monstrous Sea’s biggest fanfiction writer, transfers to her school.

Wallace thinks Eliza is just another fan, and as he draws her out of her shell, she begins to wonder if a life offline might be worthwhile. But when Eliza’s secret is accidentally shared with the world, everything she’s built, her story, her relationship with Wallace, and even her sanity begins to fall apart.

Learn more about the importance of mental health

Browse resources, download coloring pages, and more!

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